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Connecticut Medals of Science and Technology

The Connecticut Medal of Science and the Connecticut Medal of Technology are the state’s highest honors for scientific and technological achievement in fields crucial to Connecticut’s economic competiveness. Modeled after the National Medal of Science and the National Medal of Technology and Innovation respectively, these awards are made by the State of Connecticut, with the assistance of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, in alternating years.

Unlike their federal counterparts, the state medals are designed to laud individuals, not teams or entire corporations. The work the awards honor must also have a "clear association with Connecticut," meaning it must have been performed in the state, at least in its final stages, or in a company or institution closely affiliated with the state.

Beginning with the 2004 Medal of Technology, the medals are awarded bi-annually in alternate years.

Criteria for the Connecticut Medal of Technology
Criteria for the Connecticut Medal of Science


Cato T. Laurencin, MD, PhD
2016 Recipient
Connecticut Medal of Technology

Cato T. Laurencin

Dr. Cato T. Laurencin is University Professor at the University of Connecticut,
CEO of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science,
Director of the Institute for Regenerative Engineering, and
Endowed Chair Professor, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, UConn Health
[Photo: Andrew Bramante, CASE Photographer]

Dr. Cato T. Laurencin is honored with the 2016 Connecticut Medal of Technology as a world-renowned physician-scientist in orthopaedic surgery, engineering, and materials science, who has developed technologies that are revolutionary and in use in important applications in the marketplace.

Dr. Laurencin is a University Professor at UConn—only the eighth person in the school’s history—which recognizes extraordinary academic excellence, and sustained, high-level achievements in administration at the school and is UConn’s highest faculty achievement. He is Chief Executive Officer of the Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science and is the Founding Director of the Institute for Regenerative Engineering and the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Center for Biomedical, Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences at UConn Health. Additionally, he is a professor across the university, a board certified orthopaedic surgeon, endowed Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, and was the faculty leader in the development of the Bioscience Connecticut Initiative.

Dr. Laurencin is the scientific founder of Soft Tissue Regeneration, a Connecticut company that is commercializing breakthrough technologies for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) regeneration and rotator cuff regeneration. The rotator cuff device has been cleared for use by the FDA, and the ACL device is in clinical trials in Europe. Dr. Laurencin also is Scientific Co-founder of Natural Polymer Devices, a Connecticut company focused on developing polysaccharide polymer technologies for bone regeneration, which is in the process of seeking FDA clearance of a novel fracture repair device for the treatment of cervical spine fractures.

Dr. Laurencin has served as a permanent member of the orthopaedic device panel for the US Food and Drug Administration and was appointed to the National Science Advisory Board of the FDA, the overseeing body of that agency.

Dr. Laurencin is an elected member the National Academy of Medicine and the
National Academy of Engineering, the first orthopaedic surgeon in history to achieve dual election. In Connecticut, he was named the 2014 CURE Connecticut Academic Entrepreneur of the Year. He is a recipient of the National Medal of Technology & Innovation (2015) and the Technology Innovation and Development Award from the Society for Biomaterials, was named one of the 100 Engineers of the Modern Era by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (2009), and was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors (2013). He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Biomedical Engineering Society, the Materials Research Society, and the American Chemical Society. Internationally, he is a Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Sciences, a Foreign Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, an Associate Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences, and a Fellow of The World Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Laurencin is member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering.

Connecticut
Medal of Science

Recipients:

Frederic M. Richards (1995)
Sterling Professor Emeritus of Molecular Biophysics
and Biochemistry
Yale University

For more about Frederic Richards and his work, click here. 


Ronald R. Coifman (1996)
Professor of Mathematics
Yale University

For more about Ronald Coifman and his work, click here.


William C. Stwalley (2005)
Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor and Head,
Physics Department
University of Connecticut

For more about William Stwalley and his work, click here.


Michael P. Snyder (2007)
Lewis B. Cullman Professor of Molecular, Cellular and
Developmental Biology
Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Director of the Yale Center for Genomics and Proteomics
Yale University


For more about Michael Snyder and his work, click here.


Robert R. Birge (2009)
Harold S. Schwenk, Sr., Distinguished Chair in Chemistry
University of Connecticut


For more about Robert Birge and his work, click here.


Steven L. Suib (2011)
University of Connecticut Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor
Head, Chemistry Department
University of Connecticut


For more about Steven Suib and his work, click here.


Thomas A. Steitz (2013)
Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Professor of Chemistry
Yale University
Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator

For more about Thomas Steitz and his work, click here.


Joan A. Steitz (2015)
Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Yale University
Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator

For more about Joan Steitz and her work, click here.

Connecticut
Medal of Technology

Recipients:

H. Joseph Gerber (1995)
Founder, Chairman, and President
Gerber Scientific, Inc.

For more about Joseph Gerber and his work, click here.


Charles H. Kaman (1996)
Founder and
Chief Executive Officer
Kaman Corporation

For more about Charles Kaman and his work, click here.


Anthony J. DeMaria (2004)
Founder and Chief Scientist
Coherent*DEOS, LLC

For more about Anothony DeMaria and his work, click here.


Gene Banucci (2006)
Founder and Chairman
ATMI, Inc.

For more about Gene Banucci and his work, click here.


Tso-Ping Ma (2008)
Raymond John Wean
Professor of
Electrical Engineering
Yale University

For more about Tso-Ping Ma and his work, click here.


Jonathan M. Rothberg (2010)
Chairman, CEO and Founder
Ion Torrent™

For more about Jonathan M. Rothberg and his work, click here.


Yaakov Bar-Shalom (2012)
Marianne E. Klewin Professor in Engineering and
Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor, University of Connecticut

For more about Yaakov Bar-Shalom and his work, click here.


Frederick J. Leonberger (2014)
Principal of EOvation Advisors, LLC
Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer (ret.)
JDS Uniphase Corporation

For more about Frederick J. Leonberger and his work, click here.


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This page last updated: November 2, 2016 8:54 PM